IG

The participants were introduced to Orientalism and Neo-Orientalism. The focus was on the conception of an Orientalist aesthetics as a hegemonic process of representing the 'other'.
The workshop investigated the skewed dimensions of memory and othering. Avoiding the Orientalist visual repertoire was not an easy task; should designers accept representational tasks? how to consult the target audience? How to turn down a job?
The workshop asked the participants to design a milk pack for the Arab communities in Germany. The brief was abrupt and timed leading to controversial outcomes and a productive discussion on representation and ethics.

Cultural Identity Representation: An-Other Workshop

Time: 1 Days

N. of participants: 7

A short-format workshop designed to challenge participants to represent a migrant culture.

 

Through the use of analog techniques, participants produced and analyzed a visual outcome while confronting questions such as: how can we design for an audience we do not know? How can we depict a culture we do not identify with? And what are the tools designers should seek when dealing with cultural representation and migrant communities? A short presentation on rethinking image, identity and design accompanied the session.

 

The workshop was part of the ‘HURRA HURRA, The International Festival of Design Education for the 21st Century’ at Halle-Salle, Germany. The festival is the result of an interdisciplinary term project and is mainly curated, designed, organized and produced by design students from Burg Giebichenstein Kunsthochschule Halle.

Cultural Identity Representation: An-Other Workshop

Time: 1 Days

N. of participants: 7

A workshop presenting a series of challenges around identity representation and cultural appropriation.

A short-format workshop designed to challenge participants to represent a migrant culture.

 

Through the use of analog techniques, participants produced and analyzed a visual outcome while confronting questions such as: how can we design for an audience we do not know? How can we depict a culture we do not identify with? And what are the tools designers should seek when dealing with cultural representation and migrant communities? A short presentation on rethinking image, identity and design accompanied the session.

 

The workshop was part of the ‘HURRA HURRA, The International Festival of Design Education for the 21st Century’ at Halle-Salle, Germany. The festival is the result of an interdisciplinary term project and is mainly curated, designed, organized and produced by design students from Burg Giebichenstein Kunsthochschule Halle.

The participants were introduced to Orientalism and Neo-Orientalism. The focus was on the conception of an Orientalist aesthetics as a hegemonic process of representing the 'other'.
The workshop investigated the skewed dimensions of memory and othering. Avoiding the Orientalist visual repertoire was not an easy task; should designers accept representational tasks? how to consult the target audience? How to turn down a job?
The workshop asked the participants to design a milk pack for the Arab communities in Germany. The brief was abrupt and timed leading to controversial outcomes and a productive discussion on representation and ethics.